Posts tagged ‘Journalism’

May 2, 2012

Yellow Journalism and Scare Mongering

My final post is concerned with the term “yellow journalism”. It describes a type of journalism and publication which uses large headlines, big pictures and sensationalist terms to appeal to readers. The British Press has somewhat of a reputation when it comes to its obsession with tabloid newspapers, especially when an interesting and controversial story is made public. I am writing about the origins of yellow journalism and its perks and pitfalls when it comes to subject matter. Yellow journalism has also been described as an instigator in moral panics or scare mongering and I shall be providing examples as to how this type of journalism is beneficial and dangerous.

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March 29, 2012

Citizen Journalism and the Age of Misinformation

Citizen journalism has blossomed in an age of internet resources. Twitter, Facebook and news sites such as Now Public  enable anyone with a computer to become a journalist in its most basic terms. They report on events if they’ve witnessed them and they can upload photos of what they’ve seen and all this information is distributed around the public domain. However, I should make it clear that citizen journalism is not limited to the internet. In print publications, they rely on photographs and images, many of which are provided by citizen journalists.

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March 23, 2012

Freedom of Speech vs. Journalism

The term ‘Press freedom‘ encompasses so many different aspects, from the right to free speech to the protection of journalists in conflict situations. Freedom of speech remains debated between news organisations and political and social groups. Should press freedom allow journalists to report on what they wish or are journalists exercising freedom of speech too liberally?

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March 13, 2012

The Man Who Broke Into Auschwitz- Critical Review

The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz is the eye-witness testimony of solider Denis Avey. Captured in Libya and sent to the camp E715, it neighboured the concentration camp Auschwitz III, Buna-Monowitz. There he claims to have switched places with a Dutch Jewish inmate and stayed within the concentration camp for a night on two separate occasions. Avey’s account boasts a voyage of an out-spoken, laddish soldier, drawn into the war by the promise of adventure, eventually turned into an emotionally-repressed and fearful individual. While many books have been written by survivors of the Holocaust, this book explores the man who risked his own well-being on a task which was spurred by his need to bear witness to what events were unfolding within Germany’s secret camps.

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March 12, 2012

The freedom of information: Extending expertise in news features

Whilst news is constructed around a specific event and follows the criteria relating to the inverted pyramid of news writings who, what, where, when and why, the news feature is something more of a longitude,  wider picture. It is the complete story on a recent topic and while it is written with similar urgency to a typical news story, it is based around the additional facts with provide the reader with more information. This post is looking at what to include and effective examples of news features to illustrate.

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March 2, 2012

The Journalist and the Law: How to avoid being sued

There is a delicate balance between journalism and the law. The law has adapted to fit to the new types of media which encompass our world but the balance remains as to how the law can regulate the media when the media is the outlet which brings the information to the masses. If there is a need to know and a need to share, is the law there protecting or hindering?

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February 23, 2012

Journalism and Social Media: The New Frontier

I have previously written about the advantages and disadvantages of living in a world when Twitter and Facebook have become crucial tools in the journalism field. Making points about the speed of reporting and the misinformation that could be spread around when reporting using social media, I have not fully explored the advantages of such a tool. While reading ‘The Big Book of Social Media’ edited by Robert Fine, many advantages of social media are discussed and how it has helped release a new type of online journalism. One that celebrates independence and recognition.

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February 16, 2012

Straight from the Source

As a report is released in the UK today citing the protection of whistle blowers and sources as a priority, it is always important to distinguish which sources are considered reliable. Credibility within the news and journalism cycle is always paramount. If you do not get a reliable source when writing or broadcasting a piece then you run the risk of being disciplined, fired or even sued. The question always is, what makes a source credible?

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February 11, 2012

Hitting a deadline

Most jobs entail a certain level of concentration and commitment. Most jobs also have deadlines, numbers you have to reach and reports you have to get drafted. However, in journalism the concept of deadlines is slightly more heightened to the point of thinking of each piece as a time trap.

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February 6, 2012

The art of the interview

As my first proper exercise out in the journalism field, my partner and I went out to interview students and staff around the University on Friday. Relating to the recent cold snap that has been embracing Britain, we were assigned to interview as many people as we could to find out how they were coping with the weather. Whilst going out in the sub-zero temperatures was not a pleasant experience, I found the actual assignment to be quite enjoyable!

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