Posts tagged ‘Law’

May 2, 2012

Yellow Journalism and Scare Mongering

My final post is concerned with the term “yellow journalism”. It describes a type of journalism and publication which uses large headlines, big pictures and sensationalist terms to appeal to readers. The British Press has somewhat of a reputation when it comes to its obsession with tabloid newspapers, especially when an interesting and controversial story is made public. I am writing about the origins of yellow journalism and its perks and pitfalls when it comes to subject matter. Yellow journalism has also been described as an instigator in moral panics or scare mongering and I shall be providing examples as to how this type of journalism is beneficial and dangerous.

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March 29, 2012

Citizen Journalism and the Age of Misinformation

Citizen journalism has blossomed in an age of internet resources. Twitter, Facebook and news sites such as Now Public  enable anyone with a computer to become a journalist in its most basic terms. They report on events if they’ve witnessed them and they can upload photos of what they’ve seen and all this information is distributed around the public domain. However, I should make it clear that citizen journalism is not limited to the internet. In print publications, they rely on photographs and images, many of which are provided by citizen journalists.

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March 23, 2012

Freedom of Speech vs. Journalism

The term ‘Press freedom‘ encompasses so many different aspects, from the right to free speech to the protection of journalists in conflict situations. Freedom of speech remains debated between news organisations and political and social groups. Should press freedom allow journalists to report on what they wish or are journalists exercising freedom of speech too liberally?

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March 12, 2012

The freedom of information: Extending expertise in news features

Whilst news is constructed around a specific event and follows the criteria relating to the inverted pyramid of news writings who, what, where, when and why, the news feature is something more of a longitude,  wider picture. It is the complete story on a recent topic and while it is written with similar urgency to a typical news story, it is based around the additional facts with provide the reader with more information. This post is looking at what to include and effective examples of news features to illustrate.

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March 2, 2012

The Journalist and the Law: How to avoid being sued

There is a delicate balance between journalism and the law. The law has adapted to fit to the new types of media which encompass our world but the balance remains as to how the law can regulate the media when the media is the outlet which brings the information to the masses. If there is a need to know and a need to share, is the law there protecting or hindering?

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February 16, 2012

Straight from the Source

As a report is released in the UK today citing the protection of whistle blowers and sources as a priority, it is always important to distinguish which sources are considered reliable. Credibility within the news and journalism cycle is always paramount. If you do not get a reliable source when writing or broadcasting a piece then you run the risk of being disciplined, fired or even sued. The question always is, what makes a source credible?

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December 13, 2010

Paparazzi vs. Celebrities

Who hasn’t had a skim through a magazine and seen a celebrity in a compromising position? Or had a look on HeatWorld or Perez Hilton‘s blog to read the latest celebrity gossip? Many may just think of the images as a crucial element to any article or feature but now there are several celebrities who have said that they want the “stalking” by the paparazzi to stop so they can live a normal life. Should celebrities been granted more privacy or, having their careers made by the public, should they just accept that this is the lifestyle of being a celebrity?

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